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The 15 Most Overrated Movies of the 1990s

In a decade that included the advent of grunge music, the rise of the Clinton family into political power, and the utter domination of Michael Jordan, the 1990s offered the world some truly incredible

In a decade that included the advent of grunge music, the rise of the Clinton family into political power, and the utter domination of Michael Jordan, the 1990s offered the world some truly incredible things. 90210 dominated television, and Tickle Me Elmo caused fist fights in stores all around the country. The cinematic world would be completely redefined over the next decade, as people like Quentin Tarantino, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Tom Hanks would change the landscape of movies forever. Inhabitants of the 90s were treated to Pulp Fiction, Forrest Gump and The Shawshank Redemption in the same year!

Some of my all-time favorite movies came directly from the decade that helped shape me as a person. Now, sentimental memories aside, the 90s also had some movies that were beyond bad. Movies that made you question movie studios and actors like. Movies that had people wondering how easy it was to write a script themselves. How did the decade that gave us Goodfellas also give us Super Mario Bros? I suppose that the universe always tends to balance itself out.

Within the expansive jumble that is 90s movies, we have ourselves some that have been given way more credit than they deserve. I'm not trying to say that all of these movies belong in the same breath as Kazaam, because that's just callous. These movies just aren't nearly as amazing as the masses have been led to believe, which places them on our list of "The 15 Most Overrated Movies of the 1990s".

15 Armageddon (1998)

via denofgeek.com

While Michael Bay continues to receive a barrage of negative feedback over his films, this one might be my least favorite, and that's saying something. Hitting theaters during the summer of 1998, Armageddon would make a staggering 553 million dollars at the summer box office, and the soundtrack still brings back memories of my junior high school dances. To this day, I find very few people who dislike this film, which puts me in the interesting position of going against the grain.

14 Starship Troopers (1997)

via warisboring.com

While this intergalactic war film may take place in outer space, Starship Troopers is anything but out of this world. Based on the 1959 novel, Starship Troopers was an oversized, big-budget movie that failed to deliver any semblance of a decent story to accompany its great special effects and CGI work. While it was a box office success, critics spent the better part of their time pumping out negative reviews for this mess of a film.

13 Batman & Robin (1999)

via screenrant.com

In 1999, the Caped Crusader was making his way back to the big screen with George Clooney taking over as Batman. The all-star cast seemed like it just may pull off a successful return to prominence for the waning franchise, and the marketing campaign was everywhere. When reviews started to trickle out, they shot this movie down in an embarrassing way. In no way, shape, or form was this movie praised. It was ravaged by critics, and rightfully so.

12 The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996)

via bustle.com

Disney's renaissance came in the 1990s, as the beloved studio pumped out some of the biggest hits of the decade in abundance. Films like Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King, and Aladdin continue to be standouts two decades after their release. Along with every set of masterpieces comes those films that don't really seem to have a place with the rest. Such is the case for The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

11 Robin Hood: Men in Tights (1993)

via sourcefed.com

If you were to take a look at the cast and director, it would be easy to make the assumption that Robin Hood: Men in Tights would keep you laughing, and may even become one of your favorite flicks. You would find yourself sadly mislead, as this movie has been overrated ever since it debuted in 1993. Mel Brooks is a legend in the industry, but the movie is a rare smudge on his illustrious career.

10 Office Space (1999)

via archeravenue.net

Of all of the comedies of the 1990s, this film's popularity was always a bit puzzling to me. Written and directed by Mike Judge, Office Space was a modest financial success, but has maintained a strong following many years later. The movie was slated to appeal to the everyday office worker, and people seemed to eat it up. For the most part, critics seemed to enjoy movie as well, and Office Space remains alive and well through frequent conversational quotes, and an internet meme featuring actor Gary Cole that still makes its rounds through various websites.

9 Face/Off (1997)

via screeningnotes.com

In Face/Off, we have a movie about mistaken identity that may be best remembered as a movie with mistaken praise. Directed by John Woo, and starring John Travolta and Nicolas Cage, Face/Off would go on to be a monumental success for Paramount Pictures. The plot had movie goers ready to see how the two stars would essentially portray each other while navigating their way through this summer thriller. 245 million dollars later, Paramount Pictures had themselves a smash hit. Most critics applauded the movie, and it would receive much acclaim.

8 Independence Day (1996)

via independent.co.uk

Will Smith is undeniably one of the biggest stars that has ever walked the planet. He's rare, in the sense that he has had massive amounts of success in music, television, and in movies. Having a career that has lasted as long as his, it's impossible to hit a homerun on every single at bat. One of his missteps came in the massively overrated blockbuster Independence Day. The movie dominated in 1996, racking up over 800 million dollars, and spawning a God awful sequel almost two decades later. The movie is good, and that's the truth.

7 Scream (1996)

via thegeekiary.com

Wes Craven has had the distinction of making some of the greatest horror movies of all-time. The Hills Have Eyes and A Nightmare on Elm Street are perhaps two of the best movies in his storied career. So, it came as no surprise that his 1996 film Scream would be one of the biggest thrillers of the decade, having breathed new life into the waning genre. The mask worn by the killer became a Halloween staple for years to come, and the movie spawned several sequels.

6 The Truman Show (1998)

via popsci.com

Very few actors dominated the 1990s like Jim Carrey. It seemed like he couldn't do any wrong, and the release of 1998's The Truman Show was highly anticipated. The movie saw Carrey delve into a darker, more dramatic role, and received much critical acclaim during its theatrical run. After grossing over 264 million dollars, it was released to home video, and I eagerly rented my VHS copy, ready for Jim Carrey to make me cackle with laughter.

5 Fight Club (1999)

via gizmodo.com

A film that includes one of the greatest twists of all-time, 1999's Fight Club is often heralded as a bit of a masterpiece. Director David Fincher, along with incredible performances from Brad Pitt and Edward Norton, make this movie dark, entertaining, and have kept loyal audiences pleased. Author Chuck Palahniuk's novel of the same name is sublime, and something seems to get lost in translation on its journey from its pages to the big screen.

4 The Blair Witch Project (1999)

via horrorsociety.com

It's rare in the film industry that something in the horror genre takes the world by storm. But, that's exactly what happened in the latter part of the 90s. Filmed on a sixty thousand dollar budget, The Blair Witch Project was the creepiest thing to hit theaters in the summer of 1999. After grossing nearly 250 million dollars, rumors surrounding the truth about the movie were everywhere. Was it real? Could something this terrifying truly be lurking in the woods? Nope.

3 The Big Lebowski (1998)

via indiewire.com

Since its release in 1998, The Big Lebowski has become more popular than the Coen Brothers could have imagined. Starring Jeff Bridges, John Goodman, and featuring a cameo from Flea of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Big Lebowski is a comedic outing that does things its own way. The Coen Brothers have always been standout filmmakers, and they were able to work their magic in capturing some beautiful visuals all throughout the film. The dream sequence may be the best example of their true artistic ability.

2 Edward Scissorhands (1990)

via geekytyrant.com

Tim Burton's 1990 counterculture hit remains as popular today as it has ever been. Starring Johnny Depp and Winona Ryder, Edward Scissorhands was one of many box office successes for Tim Burton, earning over 85 million dollars. Critically, the movie was highly praised, and some consider this movie to be his finest work as a director and storyteller. In typical Burton fashion, the film was able to blend dark characters that are outcast in a brighter, and more colorful world.

1 Titanic (1997)

via bustle.com

Nearing the end of the 1990s, James Cameron dropped Titanic, a three hour long mega movie dealing with an ill-fated love story aboard one of the biggest disasters in human history. Starring a bright-eyed Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet, Titanic wasn't just a movie, it was a phenomenon in the 90s, and was the first movie to ever crack the one billion dollar mark. I distinctly remember my mom taking me to see it in theaters, and covering my young eyes when Kate Winslet was topless (I still managed to sneak a peek).

Boy oh boy, this movie was boring. It seemed to keep dragging on and on, with dialogue that was almost unbearable at times. And while Celine Dion kept singing away and bringing housewives everywhere to tears, I was itching to get out of that theater so that I could play some Killer Instinct. Even watching it years later yielded the same results. Sorry Mr. Cameron, but this movie is as overrated as it gets.

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The 15 Most Overrated Movies of the 1990s