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Man Abandons Biodome He Created After CO2 Levels Get Too High

A man from British Columbia, Canada had to abandon his airtight greenhouse just fourteen hours after he started his experiment on Wednesday night.

Kurtis Baute created a 10-foot by 10-foot biodome that he planned to use for three days to demonstrate how increased carbon dioxide levels impact the atmosphere.

Baute explained in a  YouTube video that he posted how he figured the experiment was going to go.  He explains that the variety of plants should provide enough oxygen (O2) for him to survive. His reasoning as to planting sunflowers, corn, beans, and squash is that they all photosynthesize differently.

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Obviously, the experiment went south pretty quickly. This may have not worked out due to the size of the cube, even if he added trees, of which he did, the transfer between carbon dioxide and oxygen was simply not high enough. Perhaps if he had more trees and plants it would have worked since there could be a higher conversion rate of the CO2 to Oxygen. However, according to Columbia Valley Pioneer, he did admit that the entire project was a little optimistic.

Baute also had to monitor the levels of CO2 inside so that he knew when enough was enough.

Despite his efforts not really working out in the long run, he did gain a lot of support on social media. According to Global News, the hashtag KurtisInAJar gained more traction with every post.

Baute's experiment is far from in vain. What he did was clearly show us how much carbon dioxide we emit by simply being alive. This means that we can now understand, on a more personal level, how many plants and trees it takes to remove the CO2 that we emit. The next part would be trying to picture the number of plants needed to remove the pollution our vehicles put out.

One user in the video's comment section actually did the math and found out that this wouldn't work out. In his estimations, the body would need around fifty liters of oxygen every hour to survive the experiment. While a plant only gives off roughly 5mm^3 of O2 which translates to around 0.005 milliliters.

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