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Top 10 Dog Breeds That Are Now Extinct

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Top 10 Dog Breeds That Are Now Extinct

Via petpaw.com.au

The well-known saying is that a dog can be a man’s best friend. Anybody who has ever had the honor of owning a well-behaved dog knows this adage to be true. A beloved dog goes from being a pet that you have to care for to a legitimate member of the family. There are a wide variety of different dog breeds, many of which could make for ideal pets. The exact breed of dog that you choose will likely be determined by factors such as the size of your house, the size of the outdoor property that you own and possibly even allergies.

Those who are not experts regarding dogs or animals, in general, may be surprised to learn that certain dog breeds have either changed or completely disappeared for one reason or another. Dogs, like other species, have evolved over time, and this has resulted in some dog breeds ceasing to exist. We fortunately have documentation of these breeds, though, and so we are able to look back and examine those breeds. We can also dream of what it would have been like to own something known as a “Turnspit,” which may be the best name associated with a breed of dog.

10. Braque du Puy 

Via canisite.com

Via canisite.com

Whether you see it or write it as Braque du Puy or Braque Dupuy, this breed of dog that no longer exists just seems somewhat snobbish in name. Per The Pointing Dog Blog, the Braque du Puy seemingly disappeared in the 1960s. A pointer dog, the Braque du Puy was a hunter who was able to cover large amounts of ground with its quick and elegant movements. What is interesting about this breed is that it is believed that the Braque du Puy could, theoretically, be brought back via breeding. Those of you looking to own such a dog could one day be in luck!

9. Hare Indian Dog 

Via commons.wikimedia.org

Via commons.wikimedia.org

According to IndianDogs.com, the Hare Indian Dog was a breed that was located “in the Northeastern Territories of Canada and the United States around the Great Bear Lake, Southwest to Lake Winnipeg and Lake Superior and West to the Mackenzie River.” The breed was, of course, named after the Hare Indian tribe. These loyal animals were known as hunters, but they also made for domestic pets. One interesting fact about the Hare Indian dog is that it was known as a breed that did not bark all that much. That trait made these dogs silent assassins able to sneak up on unsuspecting prey.

8. Cordoba Fighting Dog 

Via petpaw.com.au

Via petpaw.com.au

We are not going to pretend that the Cordoba Fighting Dog doesn’t sound downright terrifying. Per The Argentina Independent, the Cordoba Fighting Dog was bred in Argentina for, as you probably guessed, fighting. What stood out most about the information offered in that piece is that the Cordoba Fighting Dog had a high pain tolerance and was willing to fight even to its death. Such a dog was understandably seen as unstable, though, and thus it no longer exists today because of breeding. No offense meant to the dogs, but we are happy the Cordoba Fighting Dog is not around.

7. Molossus 

Via en.wikipedia.org

Via en.wikipedia.org

You probably don’t need to be told that the Molossus breed of dog is known for being massive. According to BulldogInformation.com, the early days of the Molossus breed come from ancient Greece. It should come as no surprise that it has been said that these dogs were used for fighting both animals and humans, and the Molossus breed made for solid “guard dogs.” While the Molossus breed as it was known does not exist today, you can see different traits of the breed in Mastiffs and in St. Bernards. Great Dane is another breed that has its history linked with the Molussus or Molosser breed.

6. Norfolk Spaniel 

Via commons.wikimedia.org

Via commons.wikimedia.org

We couldn’t blame you if your first thought after seeing a picture of a Norfolk Spaniel was “Awww!” because the dog was so adorable. The information found on the RiaHorter.com website state that these dogs were said to be “comforters” and that they resembled the English Setter. Norfolk Spaniels were, however, thicker than English Setters. From looking at available pictures of Norfolk Spaniels, it seems as if they would have made for great lap-dogs for those of us who want to pet a pup while we watch television on the couch. Norfolk Spaniels were also useful for water sports such as duck hunting.

5. Alpine Mastiff 

Via retrieverman.net

Via retrieverman.net

Are you a fan of massive dogs? The Alpine Mastiff would have been for you except for the fact that the dog breed no longer exists. According to the Dogington Post website, the Alpine Mastiff was considered as “the largest dog in England.” While the Alpine Mastiff as it was no longer exists, you can see roots of that breed in St. Bernard dogs. Those who have been around a full-grown St. Bernard can attest to how huge those dogs can be, and it may be difficult to imagine seeing an even larger version of it. Walking one of these would have been quite the task.

4. English Water Spaniel 

Via dogbreedstandards.com

Via dogbreedstandards.com

According to the website RiaHorter.com, the English Water Spaniel is a dog breed that stopped existing at some point last century. The breed may have last been seen in the 1930s. English Water Spaniels resembled poodles and had coats of curly hair. Like similar breeds, English Water Spaniels were known as dogs that were used by duck hunters. These pups were not all that big, falling a few inches shy of two-feet in height. Dog breeds such as the Golden Retriever and the English Springer Spaniel are said to have ties to the English Water Spaniel. The actual breed has vanished, though.

3. Moscow Water Dog 

Via barkpost.com

Via barkpost.com

Take a journey around the Internet, and you may see the Moscow Water Dog breed also referred to as the Moscow Retriever and the Moscow Diver. The Moscow Water Dog is now known as the precursor for what became the Russian Black Terrier. What stands out most in pictures of the Moscow Water Dog was that these dogs had shaggy hair, which would make sense when you think about the environment in which they were raised. One can find different breeds of dogs that have ties to the Moscow Water Dog to this day, and so you can do more than just dream of what it would have been like to own one.

2. Tesem 

Via dicasamarziali.com

Via dicasamarziali.com

The Tesem was a breed of dog that was found in Ancient Egypt. According to the Wild Life of The World book, the Tesem has been compared to the greyhound breed and also to a “large mongrel Terrier.” Tesem dogs were known for their long legs, and they were also regarded as hunting dogs. Those who have seen a well-groomed greyhound up close knows that they can be majestic and beautiful dogs, and thus we are going to assume that the same could have been said about the Tesem breed that unfortunately no longer exists. We particularly like the curly tails that are depicted in drawings of Tesem dogs!

1. Turnspit Dog 

Via thedabbler.co.uk

Via thedabbler.co.uk

Thanks to a book that was published centuries ago, we know that these dogs were once called “Turnspete” dogs. That term was later known as “Turnspit.” From looking at pictures of the Turnspit and from reading descriptions of the dog breed that no longer exists, one could suggest that the Turnspit was similar to a type of Terrier. One random piece of dog trivia is that Queen Victoria apparently kept Turnspits as pets. Any dog that is good enough for actual royalty is good enough for us, even though we may consider changing the name of the breed in order to offer our respect to this noble animal.

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