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Uber To Air Test Flying Cars In Australia

The widely popular transport service known as Uber has been interested in the world of flying cars and is going to start testing them in Australia.

Australia will be the host of the third city in the UberAir lineup. The other two cities are Los Angeles and Dallas. The two cities in Australia are going to be both Melbourne and Sydney.

One notable thing is that UberAir also has plans to expand into five other countries. They are Australia (Sydney and Melbourne), Brazil (Rio de Janeiro and the state of São Paulo), France (Paris), India (Mumbai, Delhi, and Bangalore) and Japan (Tokyo).

Uber is working with the countries so it can go international. This was first announced at the Uber Elevate conference in Tokyo, Japan on Thursday.

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Via TheINQUIRER

While all the listed cities are just test areas, it's going to lay the framework for expanding on-demand flights with the company. Even if these listed places don't end up being an actual location, it will certainly be a learning opportunity.

This means that Uber is actively looking to expand something that most people want to use, but just can't because the service isn't there. That demand alone could fuel Uber to expand its services and make this flying taxi a reality.

One thing that people tend to forget is that this is not going to look like a flying car from Star Wars, it's using a sci-fi concept, sure, but it will not be a copy of that model. It will instead look more towards a giant human carrying drone. In fact, it's known as the electric vertical take-off and landing vehicle (eVTOL). It should have powerful batteries and effective aerodynamic designs and of course, many propellors to create enough lift (the force of an aircraft that counteracts the weight effect) to actually fly.

According to CNet, the project has even seen its first design of the aircraft come out since Uber is working with Embraer and Aurora Flight Sciences, owned by Boeing. The design has eight propellers and should be able to take off vertically as well as travel at 150 to 200 miles per hour (240 to 320 kilometers/hour).

As per usual with anything in the world, there is some good and bad. This service cannot be cheap, Uber needs to pay for a pilot, paperwork and a ton of other expenses. This means that it will likely cost more to use at first, but will become cheaper when it turns into a more mainstream event.

The good part is that if you can afford it, you'll get to fly around in the sky then likely take a short ride to work. You also get the benefit of saying that you fly to work. It's something that people have been dreaming about for decades if not longer.

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