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New Study Links Exercise To Mental Health

Exercise is very good for you, you should do it regularly. There are many more reasons you should exercise than there are why you should not. It's really that simple. Do it.

The benefits of regular exercise are endless. Weight control is the first one that springs to mind, but overall health, a longer lifespan and simply looking great should be all the motivation you need.

Recent studies have found that exercise can even help curb hair loss, and you should already be well aware of its importance when it comes to fighting cardiovascular disease, diabetes and the like. But newer research has since linked exercise to improved mental health.

via healinghealthteas.com

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The findings of a recently published study, said to be the largest of its kind in the United States, concludes that regular exercise could boost mental health significantly, as well as reduce the likelihood of depression.

A research team analyzed data from over 1.2 million US residents aged 18 and up and found that those who had exercised fewer days had worse mental health than those who did. The subjects who did not exercise regularly experienced an average of 3.4 days of poor mental health each month while the individuals who did take part in some form of exercise on a frequent basis reported only experiencing two days of the same.

Persons who had been diagnosed with depression but exercised regularly suffered seven days of poor mental health a month. Conversely, the subjects who did not partake in an exercise routine suffered an average of four more days of bad mental health.

The biggest positives were seen in persons who participated in popular sports such as cycling, aerobic and gym activities.

via thecut.com

According to the researchers, more isn't better when it comes to exercise - for mental health at least. 30-60 minutes a day every other day or 45 minutes three to five days a week was said to be optimal.

The study, however, does not claim that exercise should replace treatments from doctors or medical healthcare providers. While it does help somewhat, it shouldn't substitute for medication, therapy and other lifestyle changes.

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