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New AI Technology Is Used To Make Cattle & Shrimp Farmer Jobs Easier

Artificial intelligence and cattle farming aren't two things you would think of putting together, but clearly, it's a marriage that can work.

Artificial intelligence is a fascinating area of technology right now and one that is advancing at an incredible rate. Programming a computer to do exactly what we tell it is one thing, but one that develops and learns from its mistakes is something else. AI was once merely a theme for science fiction movies, now it is a reality that we are applying to items we use in our everyday lives.

Some people find the concept of AI slightly terrifying. The thought of robots learning, adapting, rising up and taking over. That's harking back to those sci-fi movies again. In reality, AI is here to help us and make our lives easier. One recent development where AI can be applied to everyday life is a program that can read hand-written essays, mark them, and even provide feedback. A Godsend for all of you teachers out there.

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One area that most likely believe AI can't possibly work hand-in-hand with is the farming industry, but that's where you'd be wrong. As reported by FORTUNE, Cargill is currently using AI to ease the workloads of cattle and shrimp farmers in the US. The agricultural giant is using AI in a number of ways to improve the farming and ranching industries.

How on Earth is Cargill combining farming and AI we hear you ask? Well, let us explain. When it comes to cattle, Cargill is supplying farmers with AI that reads dairy cows' faces, as well as their movements and behaviors. This information allows farmers to more accurately figure out a cow's pregnancy rotation schedule and thus discover the optimal time to inseminate.

How Cargill is helping shrimp farmers is even more fascinating. Justin Kershaw, the company's chief information officer, explained that shrimp make a distinctive noise while they're feeding. By using an internet-connected acoustic device, farmers can listen in and determine whether or not they are supplying the shrimp with too much or too little chum. Pretty amazing and groundbreaking stuff, and a link that we would never have made ourselves.

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