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The 15 Types Of Tweets We All Hate Seeing

Technology
The 15 Types Of Tweets We All Hate Seeing

Via brunchnews.com

The beauty of Twitter – and indeed all forms of social media that are accessible in the modern world – is that everybody gets an opportunity to say what they want to say without any filtering. Twitter users can garner a following, gather a network of online fans and friends, talk about what they want and express whatever opinions they want until their hearts are content.

But Twitter can also be a curse – at least for the people who have to put up with those who abuse it to the point that they need banning from all forms of social media for life.

For every informative, intelligent, friendly user who isn’t stuck so far up their own backside that they can see what they ate for breakfast, there are at least ten idiots whose illiterate online input is enough to make you tear your own eyes out – or at least it seems that way.

In this article, we’re going to highlight a number of ways in which Twitter can be annoying, by listing some of the worst things Twitter users (quite possibly YOU) put out there for all to see. Here are the fifteen types of tweets we all hate seeing (unless you’re one of the people who tweet them. In which case take note!).

15. Inspirational Quotes

via:abroadstudy.net

via:abroadstudy.net

Inspirational quotes are fine. They’re great, in fact. Well, they can be, when they come from inspirational people.

If Martin Luther King, Jr. told you to be yourself, or if Nelson Mandela told you to never stop believing, or if Stephen Hawking told you that you could be whatever you wanted to be, you’d listen. When a fifteen-year-old boy tweets while he’s sitting on the toilet, in between playing Call of Duty and scratching his crotch, that you should be the master of your own destiny, you probably shouldn’t.

14. “Bored” Selfies

via:lazygamer.net

via:lazygamer.net

Selfies are a part of modern life – that we have been forced to accept. Heck, the word “selfie” has been added to the dictionary, so what choice do we have? And, of course, Twitter is full of them.

The fact is, if you’re on holiday and there’s something interesting in the background – a beautiful beach, a world famous landmark or Disneyland – selfies are fine. “Bored” selfies are not. If you’re so bored that you have to take a selfie, maybe you should get out and do something. Moreover, how does taking a selfie cure boredom? Just admit that you’re taking a picture of yourself because you’re desperately seeking the approval of others.

13. Irrelevent Hashtags

via:thomasreteam.com

via:thomasreteam.com

People seem to have forgotten what hashtags are for. The purpose of the hashtag in social media circles is to highlight trending words so that other users can identify tweets/statuses about a particular topic – for example, if there was a big fire in London, you might hashtag “#LondonFire” so that others can identify what you are saying about a hot news topic.

Some people just abuse the hashtag – and for no real reason. #Writing #a #sentence #like #this is really no different – and offers no advantages – to writing a sentence like this. Placing random hashtags all over the place just makes you look silly.

12. Too Many Hashtags

via:troll.me

via:troll.me

On a strongly related note to the last point, some people – regardless of whether or not they are using their hashtags in the correct manner – abuse the privilege by simply using too many of them.

Let’s go back to that hypothetical fire in London. It’s okay to tweet “Heard about the fire in London! Hope everyone’s okay! #LondonFire.” It’s not okay to tweet “Heard about the #fire in #London! Hope everyone’s okay!” #LondonFire #Burning #Flames #Hot #Heat #OMG #Smoke #Orange #ThoughtsAreWithEveryoneConcerned #Prayers #Inferno.” Just tone it down a bit, people!

11. The Sub-Tweet

via:Twitter

via:Twitter

Sub-tweets are completely pointless, get the culprit nowhere and achieve nothing – and yet Twitter is absolutely full of them. To elaborate (if you didn’t already know), a sub-tweet is a tweet directed at one person in particular without actually naming or tagging that person in said tweet.

For example, let’s say somebody has been saying bad things behind your back. You know who that person is, you know their Twitter handle, but instead of tweeting them directly – or, you know, CONFRONTING THEM IN REAL LIFE – you simply tweet “Talk about me behind my back will you?! Some friend you are!” Utterly ridiculous.

10. Begging For Retweets & Favourites

via:Twitter

via:Twitter

Some people on Twitter simply get a kick from getting retweets and favourites. Apparently it makes them look and feel popular… or something. Actually, beggars, it makes you look ridiculous and you should stop doing it immediately!

An example might be something like “Retweet this picture of me if you think it should be my new avi, favourite it if I should keep it as it is!” It’s giving a purpose to the idea of asking for retweets and favourites, in order to hide the fact that, really, you just want to get as many retweets and favourites as you can in order to make yourself look better.

9. “Retweet For A DM”

via:YouTube

via:YouTube

This is very much related to the last point, but it’s a more specific tweet and an even more narcissistic action. Some people will tweet asking you to retweet the tweet in question in order to receive the privilege of direct message (a DM) from them – what a treat huh?!

We suppose this is great if a celebrity does it (though they rarely do, as they’d never be able to DM everybody), but when a normal person who fancies themselves as a “Twitter celebrity” does it, they just look stupid. The worst example of this kind of tweet is “RT me and I’ll DM you my honest opinion of you!” Like anybody wants the opinion of someone who tweets that kind of drivel! Get over yourselves!

8. Vague, Attention-Seeking Tweets

via:keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk

via:keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk

One of the worst things about social media is the fact that it gives people who don’t need attention the chance to try and get it (granted, if it helps someone genuinely in need, that’s a good thing, but 9/10 times the people who seek attention on social media are just that – attention seeking). “Gonna quit Twitter,” “could today have been any worse?” and “can’t believe what’s just happened” are three such examples of vague, pointless tweets that emphasise that something is wrong, but pointlessly don’t explain what (they probably missed their favourite television show or something).

It’s even worse when somebody replies to the “feeling sorry for myself” type tweets asking what’s wrong and the culprit replies with “I can’t say.” Bore off!

7. Tweeted Replies With Periods At The Front

via:Twitter

via:Twitter

When you directly reply to someone on Twitter and their @handle appears at the start of the tweet, the only people who can see your reply are you, the person you are replying to (and anyone else whose @handle is in the tweet) and those lucky people on your timeline who follow both you and the person you’re replying to.

That is unless you put something in front of the @handle of the person you’re replying to – that way, it will appear on all of your follower’s timelines as a normal tweet. People try to do this subtly by putting a period/full stop in front of those replies – but we know what they’re doing! These people want everyone to see everything they tweet – it’s essentially another form of attention seeking.

6. Boring Activity Tweets

via:evo-lite.com

via:evo-lite.com

“In bed,” “On the bus on the way to work,” “In the bath,” “About to get a shower,” “Sitting on the toilet,” “Eating my dinner”… seriously… Who. The hell. Cares?

If you’ve got something interesting to say, are doing something interesting, are talking to a friend about a common interest or have a stunning picture to share with the world, by all means tweet about it. If you’re staring at the ceiling or your bowels are moving, for goodness sake keep it to yourself, because not one person gives even the smallest percentage of a damn.

5. Food Pictures

via:Twitter

via:Twitter

There are two key reasons why food pictures on Twitter – or indeed any social media platform – are wrong. The first is that, if you’re hungry, the last thing you want to see is an image of some food that somebody else is about to tuck into – frankly, food picture tweets are thoughtless and inconsiderate!

The second reason is that the vast majority of people don’t care about your food! Moreover, in the vast majority of cases when food pictures are tweeted with descriptions about how “on point” the food is and how “lucky” people are to have people making them such delicious food, the food is completely unremarkable and not worth showing people in the first place!

4. One-Word Tweets

via:Twitter

via:Twitter

If you’re only going to tweet one word, you might as well not tweet at all – and yet millions of Twitter users are responsible for single-word tweets on daily basis!

Granted, in some cases – when there’s context to a single-word tweet – it’s acceptable (for example, if you’ve been commentating on a soccer match via your tweets and you simply want to tweet “GOAL”, that makes a modicum of sense), but if you haven’t tweeted for several hours and suddenly tweet “lol” or “damn” or “wow”, nobody is going to have a clue what the hell you’re talking about! So don’t do it!

3. Completely Inappropriate Retweets

via:clipartsheep.com

via:clipartsheep.com

It goes without saying that – just like pretty much every other corner of the internet – Twitter is full of content that a lot of people would deem inappropriate. It’s particularly inappropriate if you’re accessing Twitter in a public place – which is one of the reasons why, in a lot of people’s cases, they actively avoid following accounts with any kind of adult content.

Of course, there are some people who love following accounts that contain p*rnographic content and the like – and, if you happen to follow those people, you could inadvertently find yourself embarrassed by their inappropriate retweets. Picture the scene: You’re sitting with your family, browsing Twitter, and that fellow basketball fan you followed yesterday suddenly retweets an explicit image. Oh dear. You go bright red and want the ground to swallow you whole.

2. “This Is So Me!”

via:omgthatstotallyme.tumblr.com

via:omgthatstotallyme.tumblr.com

There’s a really irritating trend on Twitter at the moment, whereby an image or video will be posted that shows somebody doing something or reacting to a particular situation, and Twitter users will relate it to how they might act in the same situation and tweet “This is so me TBH OMG!” or something along those lines.

Newsflash – as a general rule, those pictures are SO EVERYBODY. A video showing somebody dancing with the tagline “when your favourite song comes on” isn’t “so you” – that’s what anybody does when their favourite song comes on! A video showing a cat enjoying having its head stroked with the tagline “when your other half strokes your forehead” isn’t “so you” – everybody enjoys having their forehead stroked! STOP MAKING EVERYTHING ABOUT YOURSELF!

1. “Am I The Only One Who…”

via:Pinterest

via:Pinterest

“Am I the only one who doesn’t like pizza?” No. “Am I the only one who thinks The Avengers was a boring movie?” No. “Am I the only one who doesn’t find Beyonce attractive?” No. “Am I the only one who’s never been to Glastonbury?” No. “Am I the only one who…” NO. NO. NO. NO. NO! You are NOT the only one!

This question is becoming more and more common in tweets, whereby any given Twitter user will ask if they are the only one in the world with a particular opinion. In 99.99999999999999999999999% of cases they are NOT the only one. There are 7 billion people living on this planet – very few people are so special that nobody else has the same opinion as them! Stop asking this damn question!

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