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Top 10 Deadliest Jobs In America For 2015

You are sitting at your desk on a sunny Friday afternoon, just staring at the clock until 5 pm and quitting time arrives. “There must be more to a career than this,” you silently ask yourself as you p

You are sitting at your desk on a sunny Friday afternoon, just staring at the clock until 5 pm and quitting time arrives. “There must be more to a career than this,” you silently ask yourself as you ponder giving it all up for an exciting job that could have you outdoors and/or traveling to places you have never before visited. It could, if the right opportunity were to arise, be the ideal situation for the person who feels that he desperately needs a significant change in his life. In some cases, you could even make more money trading in your office gig for one that is deemed, by some, to be more “dangerous.”

Be careful what you wish you for, though, as the rewards that come with some of these jobs may not be worth the risks you could face on a daily basis. Kathryn Dill of Forbes released what she referred to as a “preliminary look” at workplace fatalities as that data pertains to the deadliest jobs in America for 2015, and you may find that what you view to be an appealing career is in the top ten or the top five of the list. Ever thought about working as an aircraft pilot or a flight engineer? You could make a lot of money doing so, but you would also have, according to Forbes, the third deadliest job in America.

Want to risk your life working in a career that likely will not make you a rich person? The logging industry, according to the data presented by Forbes, is the career for you. Logging tops the Forbes list of the deadliest jobs in America for the third consecutive year, and the numbers indicate that it could be some time until this industry falls from the mountaintop. The numbers show that being in this line of work has to be a labor of love, because the financial returns are not, on paper, worth what could be lost each time that an individual heads off to work on any particular day.

10 Driver/Sales Workers and Truck Drivers: 23.4 Fatalities Per 100,000 Full-Time Employees

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9 Farming, Fishing and Forestry Occupations: 24.1 Fatalities Per 100,000 Full-Time Employees

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8 Structural Iron and Steel Workers: 25.2 Fatalities Per 100,000 Full-Time Employees

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7 Farmers, Ranchers and Other Agricultural Managers: 26 Fatalities Per 100,000 Full-Time Employees

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6 Refuse and Recyclable Material Collectors: 35.8 Fatalities Per 100,000 Full-Time Employees

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5 Roofers: 46.2 Fatalities Per 100,000 Full-Time Employees

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4 Other Extraction Workers: 51.9 Fatalities Per 100,000 Full-Time Employees

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3 Aircraft Pilots and Flight Engineers: 63.2 Fatalities Per 100,000 Full-Time Employees

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2 Fishers and Related Fishing Workers: 80.8 Fatalities Per 100,000 Full-Time Employees

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1 Logging Workers: 109.5 Fatalities Per 100,000 Full-Time Employees

Via Bigstock Images

The logging industry has been featured on television programs for good reason, and not because viewers care so much about the origins of certain consumer goods. Logging Workers ran away with the title of the deadliest jobs in America for 2015, and the non-existent race to first was not all that close. Logging workers spend the majority of their days outdoors, where they face dangerous scenarios. Along with being forced to work in harsh weather conditions, loggers can also find themselves isolated from others. Forbes reports that those who harvest and transport timber earn salaries in the “mid-$30,000 range.” The pay may not be all that great, but at least the job is dangerous: Right?

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Top 10 Deadliest Jobs In America For 2015