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15 Surprisingly Hot Photos Of Amish Women

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15 Surprisingly Hot Photos Of Amish Women

Pennsylvania is a popular tourist destination. After almost 500 years of being at the epicenter of American colonial conflict, the state is rich with English, Dutch, and American history.

So, too, was it the cradle of German, Swiss and French immigration in the 18th and 19th Centuries. And the folks at the lab have finally figured out what was tempting people. PA offers the fertile ground and temperate climate of middle Europe. Somehow, news got back and a zealous sect of German and Swiss Amish Baptists headed there along with Irish and English. The Amish were also keen to get to the new world because of religious persecution and widespread poverty on the Continent.

Today, the Amish, many of whom still talk German, are centered on the county towns of Lancaster, Strasbourg, Lititz, and Intercourse (yes, that really is the name of a town!). But the Old Order can be found elsewhere in the States such as Ohio, Indiana, and Wisconsin.

They continue to diverge from the modern society in terms of education and culture. Most believe that modest, simple clothing is essential to Christian discipleship. Because they take their life’s path from scriptures, they believe being fully clothed and wearing headgear is a submission to God.

We’ve been scratching our heads with this one trying to find some hot photos of Amish women. No mean feat when you consider most are dressed from head to toe in hessian. But we think these 15 Amish beauties may be just what you’re after.

15. Banned

The Amish don’t play musical instruments as a rule. Such a method of self-expression is said to create feelings of superiority and hubris. There are, however, a good few bootleg bands out there claiming to be Amish and one or two who were even members of the Order but left after their Rumspringa. The Amish Outlaws is a six-piece band with four of them having originally grown up in Lancaster, PA. According to their website, the audience can expect to see “men in full Amish garb releasing all of their pent up energy with an infectious joy.” What’s not to love?

True Amish are also opposed to photographs. Fixed images can accentuate individuality and call attention to one’s self, according to their culture. What’s more, their literal translation of the bible’s edicts such as “Thou shalt not make unto thyself a graven image” helps maintain their aversion.

14. Lili Simmons

American actress Lily Simmons plays young Amish girl Rebecca Bowman in Jonathan Tropper’s thriller, “Banshee.” The TV series, which began airing in 2013, follows a small-town sheriff with an assumed identity hiding from a powerful crime lord. The show garnered favorable reviews when it was first aired and like Breaking Amish the year before piqued people’s interest in the Order.

Lily Simmons modeled in her early life and then began acting at the age of 17. She started off on TV with shows like “Hollywood Is Like High School with Money” (2010). This was followed a couple of years later by “Banshee.” She also starred in the 2015 movie “Bone Tomahawk.” With her role in “Banshee,” Simmons brings an innocent beauty; we also get the distinct vibes of a Lolita-esque undertone, which fits nicely with the contradiction of values between the Amish and the outside worlds.

13. Kate Stoltzfus

Possibly one of the most famous Amish women ever to have left the prairie, Kate Stoltzfus is a celebrity in her own right. She made it big in modeling at the age of 22 when she started posing for Maxim magazine. Since then, she’s gone on to make a name for herself as a designer and humanitarian, having left the Order behind. She did, however, begin her own fashion line after her modeling, using skills she picked up as a child back in Myerstown.

We think this picture sums up the potential sexiness of every Amish woman. Under the plain-cut dress beats the heart of someone with the potential to wow the world. It’s all about self-expression, something positively forbidden back in the Myerstown community. What a shame; there must be a thousand more beauties like Stoltzfus just aching for a chance to be seen and heard.

12. Rumspringa

Before being baptized, Amish 16-year-olds begin a period of freedom called the Rumspringa, which literally means “running around.” It’s at this point that young adults are allowed to venture into “English” society, namely the outside world. A typical fortnightly gathering of boys and girls may take place at a movie theater or a club; an active pursuit of pleasures (although done responsibly) is encouraged by the rest of the community. After Rumspringer, each child is expected to return to the community to be baptized. But it doesn’t always happen like that. Some decide to live out their lives in the wider society and disassociate themselves from the Old Order altogether.

We think Yuliana Dementyeva has the young Amish look to a tee for magazine Belle Russia. During Rumspringa, there’s a sense of normality and connection with the outside world. Traditionally, the Amish are said to be uncomfortable around non-Amish people, but recent reality shows have proven otherwise.

11. Farming

After settling in Pennsylvania in the early 1700s, the Amish did what they knew best. Their zealous ways back in Switzerland and South Germany often landed them in far-flung and remote areas where it was necessary for their survival to become self-sufficient. In tandem, their popularity was at such an all-time low that none of the native Protestants would support them. Thus, the big decision about emigrating came at the near point of being starved and persecuted.

The Amish have farmed the fields of PA since they arrived but can also be found across the States. Although interwoven to some extent with modern-day American society and legislation, the Amish still retain their valuable skills of self-sufficiency. They’re prolific manufacturers of sellable products such as farming equipment, clothing, furniture, carriages, stoves, and pumps, and their food is harvested from land around them.

10. Alice Greczyn

Starring as Amish girl Mary in the 2008 film “Sex Drive,” Alice Greczyn is the perfect sizzling chastity-belted girl we might imagine we’d find someplace like Intercourse! The film is based on the young-adult novel “All the Way,” which basically recounts the adventures of a high school student’s road trip. Greczyn’s character meets the English Lance at a concert, and they fall in love, finally marrying within the community.

In reality, Lance marrying into the Old Order is easier said than done. He would have been expected to learn the Pennsylvania German dialect and be rid of every luxury he was used to as an outsider. He would then be taken to live with a staunch Amish family to get acclimatized to their way of life. Even then, there’s no guarantee of acceptance. It’s up to the rest of the church to vote for the seeker.

9. Sabrina

Another star of Breaking Amish who fled the commune for a life of normality is Sabrina High. Previously returned from NYC and the show, she struggled with drug addiction, an abusive relationship, and homelessness. Originally taken in by an Anabaptist family, she found living the English way too much and welcomed the safety of the Order’s embrace in 2015. She came out again for another series recently.

You’d think the time spent away would have been a valuable reaffirmation of her initial decision, but her latest arrest for drug possession and now, the custody charge in respect of son Oakley is making us wonder whether she can take much more. In a recent article for the Christian Post, High said she was “not capable of being a nasty person and that everyone close to her knew that. She shared that having a family was the only thing she had ever dreamed of because she did not have a sense of belongingness as she was growing up.”

8. Hats

The Amish are big on hats. But as with clothing, the common theme is plainness and practicality, thus avoiding misadventure. The men wear practical, broad-brimmed straw hats, which give them a mildly downtrodden Jewish appearance, but you’re just as likely to see an Amish boy without a hat; whereas the hair of Amish women and girls must always be covered in public. Women wear a wide variety of hats and prayer caps usually made of organza and stiffened with starch to signify a stage of life.

Until Amish boys and girls are baptized, they’re not allowed to marry. The baptism usually takes place between the ages of 18 and 22, after which it’s a free country… or at least a free commune. We think Italian Vogue has the Amish hat thing down to a fine art, literally. Mind you, if every Amish girl looked like this, the Old Order would be inundated with English “seekers.”

7.  Chic

Amish are pacifists, which is one of the reasons they hoofed it out of Europe in the 1700s; the place was a hotbed of coups, rebellions, and wars. In fact, the morality of the Amish is one of absolute peace. They have been known for their reluctance to even fight back. They don’t join the military for obvious reasons, and even the growing of mustaches is forbidden because it reminds members of European military leaders (no argument there).

They chose, instead, to farm and raise barns. In fact, barn-raising is one of the foundations of Amish culture. Just like the colonials did in the 1600s, the community comes together to erect a new building when needed; Peter Weir’s 1985 epic film, “Witness,” was the perfect example of Amish ingenuity and collectiveness. The act, “typifies selflessness and neighbors helping neighbors.” Which is nice.

6. Dolls

Posted up originally by women’s fashion store Blink London, this Amish-inspired picture shouts allure. And to be honest, if it weren’t for their solid-color, heavy-set dresses and shawls, the Old Order women would be just as sought-after as those we see walking through the town. But that’s the whole point of Amish custom — no visible flesh, no discerning sexual statement. The community’s women are just that: untouchable.

If you’ve ever seen an Amish doll, you’ll notice it doesn’t have a face. More than making them slightly less creepy, there’s an ulterior motive for making a doll like this. Faceless dolls are believed by elders to protect the commune from pride and vanity. All in all, if one chooses to live a life according to scriptures of the Bible, it’s necessary to abide by the principles of chastity and humility. And on the whole, most Amish orders are strict in their obedience to God.

5. The Woman’s Role

To say that Amish women are subdued is not all that fair, but they certainly do have a lowlier standing than the men. They’re, above all, seen as homemakers with no real decision-making capabilities within the group. They assume a traditional gender role — the sort that’s often thrown out in modern-day society. Duties include cooking, washing clothes, home management, and helping neighbors to do the same. Generally speaking, an Amish woman follows her husband’s lead.

A married Amish woman wears a dark bonnet over her prayer cap, while a married man grows a beard, which some think is as much a symbol of wedlock as wearing a ring. Dementyeva models another stunning Amish outfit wearing simple looks with stunning detailing from Ukrainian designers. This shoot was for Elle Ukraine, but we think it fits perfectly into our category of hot photos, even if she’s wearing monochrome.

4. Pin-Up Calendar

Here’s something that wouldn’t be allowed under your communal bed. Check out these awesome paintings by American artist Renee Reeser Zenick. She’s created a whole calendar’s worth of tongue-in-cheek pinups based on the world of Amish. “Plain and Sexy” is one of a number of fine art works that make a sardonic commentary on the Amish woman’s world. Plus, Zenick has added what we would consider a touch of sexiness to each. We approve.

Children are educated up until the 8th Grade, which they must do by law; this takes place usually in a one-room classroom connected to the commune. At this point, they’re usually taken out of school and learn trades rather than educational subjects. The Anabaptists won the right to do this back in 1972. The Order’s belief is that an education up until this point is sufficient for an Amish lifestyle. Some children are even schooled at home up to the cutoff point.

3. Shunned

It’s not unheard of for Amish women and men to be banished from the Order. For misdemeanors and disrespect of the religion, members have often been excommunicated, bringing a shutdown of all contact with the family; this includes the breaking of contact between parent and child. TV series The Amish: Shunned makes visible such complicated responses to being Amish through interviews with not only those who have left but also some who repent and stay.

The value of Gelassenheit — essentially a reluctance to be forward, to be self-promoting, or to assert oneself — is important to the Amish. Members who fail to conform to expectations of behavior and reverence are silenced. Although given the chance to repent, depending on the crime committed, the offender must essentially choose to leave and find another way of life if the offender is unwilling to back down.

2. Transport

The horse and cart are synonymous with the Amish. Pictures of them around Lancaster invariably show them accompanying a sad little horse in front of a hybrid caravan. That’s because members cannot use motorized vehicles. Since the Order relies on the dependence of each member for their livelihood and family’s welfare, a car is considered a threat. With greater speeds and sustainability, cars and trucks would undermine the fabric of the Order.

Although Amish people are not opposed to modern medicine and surgery in the same way the JWs are, not having health insurance poses a financial problem. Instead, members of the community pool together resources to enable the patient to be treated. They often make use of institutional medicine and modern treatments, though many Amish prefer natural and traditional remedies.

1. Amish

Here’s a fun little picture we picked up from the internet. OK, she’s not your typical prairie girl, and that dress isn’t handmade, but who’s complaining? Let’s leave the Old Order behind now and wish them all the best for the future while we take another look at “Breaking Amish.” The encounters Kate, Jeremiah, Sabrina, Abe, and Rebecca have enjoyed left us wondering what their Amish fellows make of the “good life.” But, of course, with no TV to watch, no one is any the wiser.

Despite their reluctance to adopt modern conventions, the Amish love of simple living and self-sufficiency does have some parallels with Christian beliefs, although mainstream religion has tended to evolve along with society. Still, there are worse things your sons and daughters could be doing other than farming a field or looking after livestock. It’s really not a bad way of life for those who embrace it.

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