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The 10 Most Worthless Titles in the History of Wrestling

Wrestling
The 10 Most Worthless Titles in the History of Wrestling

Via wwe.fr

Every wrestler’s goal is to win a championship. Superstars have often sacrificed blood, sweat, and tears to wear gold around their waists. Across the world, wrestlers want to be able to someday walk up to the ring with weight on them and feel that they’ve earned their rank and that their efforts were not in vein. Cameras flash and heads turn as superstars move with their championships. To these superstars, a championship is a badge of honor. They proudly hold it above their heads or swing it over their shoulders to the screams of adoring fans that shower them with respect.

These pieces of metal symbolize strength, success, valor, and most importantly, worth – most of the time. Other times, they come to mean absolutely nothing. They leave fans shaking their heads and asking, who signed off on this title? These less renowned championships pop up throughout history and some are remembered by only the most diehard wrestling fans. They range from the plain-old-stupid to the unnecessary.

Today, we are going to explore these championships. So, get ready to laugh, wonder, and shake your head. These are the 10 Most Worthless Titles in the History of Wrestling.

10. A Running Joke (WWE European Championship)

Via upload.wikimedia.org

Via upload.wikimedia.org

The WWE European Championship appropriately hails from Berlin, Germany, where the British Bulldog won it after defeating Owen Heart. He did so at the conclusion of a tournament. The title remained in Europe at first but started traveling to the U.S. after Shawn Michaels won the belt from the Bulldog in England at One Night Only. There, it became a joke. When Al Snow was the champion, he would bring it to the ring wearing different outfits reflecting European stereotypes. Shane McMahon won it with the Corporation’s help. Then, Mideon got it after finding it in Shane’s gym bag.

9. Let’s Forget About This One (WWE Light Heavyweight Championship)

Via ajsbelts.com

Via ajsbelts.com

This next one could have had a promising run. It was introduced in an 8-man tournament which ended with Taka Michinoku defeating Brian Christopher to claim the gold. Michinoku held the title for almost a year before losing to debuting Christian in ’97. The championship became a joke after Edge lost it to Gillburg, the parody wrestler who mocked WCW’s Goldberg.

Gillburg came out to sparklers instead of arena-hammering pyro like his counterpart. Afterward, it went over to Essa Rios and was mainly defended on Sunday Night Heat. It was supposed to be merged with WCW’s cruiserweight title after WWE bought the company. But, the title disappeared after X-Pac, its last recipient, got injured.

8. Buried in Mystery, But Who Cares? (WWE Junior Heavyweight Title)

Via bleacherreport.com

Via bleacherreport.com

This championship is so obscure that little documentation of it exists. It may have been inactive for different parts of the 1960s. It supposedly switched hands between Johnny DeFazio and Jackie Nicholas between 1965 and 1972. It did however float around in Japan and Mexico and it also landed in the hands of legends like Dynamite Kid and Tiger Mask. The title was created in 1965 in a joint effort between Japan’s NJPW and the WWE. The partnership died out in 1985 along with the Junior Heavyweight Title. It seemed to serve as a prototype for the Cruiserweight Champion. It just did it ahead of its time.

7. No Need For More Tag Belts (Intercontinental Tag Team Championship)

Via i.ytimg.com

Via i.ytimg.com

There’s not much of a story with this one. The Intercontinental Tag Team Championship debuted in 1991 and was held by only one team before it was retired that year. That duo was Perro Aguayo and Gran Hamada. The belts, which were secondary to the already existing tag-team titles, were supposed to serve as a link between WWE and Japan’s UWF, which WWE had just aligned with after creating the belts. However, the relationship would not live and neither would the International Tag Team Championship, which was retired the year it was debuted in 1991.

6. Girl Power? Maybe in Japan (WWF Women’s Tag Team Championship)

Via forums.wrestlezone.com

Via forums.wrestlezone.com

The WWE created the Women’s Tag Team Championships in the 80s and handed them over to Velvet McIntyre and Princess Victoria, who had just left the NWA where they were tag team women’s champions. Here is where some mystery comes in. At one point, the titles supposedly went over to Leilani Kai and Judy Martin of the Glamour Girls following a match in Egypt. Fans speculate that they were just given the titles and the match never happened. Nonetheless, the Glamour Girls held the titles for more than two years but rarely defended them in the U.S. The championships ended in Japan, where they were recaptured y the Glamour Girls before the WWE dropped the belts in 1989.

5. Girl Power? Maybe in Japan 2 (WCW Women’s Cruiserweight Champion)

Via ajsbelts.com

Via ajsbelts.com

Debuting during a 1997 episode of Nitro, the WCW Women’s Cruiserweight Championship was part of a four-woman tournament. Yup, four. The last match, however, took place on the rarely watched WCW Main Event program, where Toshie Uematsu beat Malia Hosaka to take home the gold. Literally. She took it to Japan. After the WCW Women’s Cruiserweight Championship was taken to Japan, the belt was never again defended on WCW programming. In fact, the WCW Women’s Cruiserweight Championship seemed to never be mentioned again on WCW programming.

4. The Not-So-Hardcore Belt (WCW Hardcore Championship)

Via officialfan.proboards.com

Via officialfan.proboards.com

With ECW peaking in popularity in the late 1990s, WCW also wanted to appeal to the waves of raging fans who screamed for blood, violence, and weapons. So, it introduced its own hardcore title. Some fans remember this one as the “falls count anywhere title,” because matches for it would begin backstage and end at the ring.

The concept sounds right, but WCW unfortunately mismanaged it. Instead of bringing over ECW stars to create a true hardcore atmosphere around the title, WCW used its own. At the time, WCW had its share of extreme wrestlers, but few of them held the hardcore title. Instead, it went to the likes of Reno and Eric Bischoff.

3. One For Our Neighbors in the North

via mapleleafwrestling.4t.com

via mapleleafwrestling.4t.com

This next one never even changed hands. In 1985, the WWE bought the Montreal-based Lutte International promotion. To maintain a strong presence in the north, the WWE created the Canadian Championship and handed it to “Canada’s Strongest Man” Dino Bravo. He mainly defended it in Canadian cities before the belt was quietly retired in 1986.

2. You Have To Be Wasted To Enjoy This One (The TNA World Beer Drinking Championship)

Via img1.wikia.nocookie.net

Via img1.wikia.nocookie.net

This title sounds like it can sit in frat houses across America. It was introduced in TNA in 2007 by James Storm, who was in a feud with Eric Young. Storm challenged Young to a beer-drinking match, which Young won after Storm passed out. The two’s alcohol-induced antics extended to TNA Final Showdown 2008, where they squared off in a three-round drinking game reminiscent of a scene in every college movie ever made. It involved the games Never Have I Ever, Edward 40 Hands, and a shot contest in which Storm drugged Young to win. The belt stuck around until 2008 when Rhino destroyed it. What a buzzkill.

1. Too Little Too Late (WCW Cruiserweight Tag Team Championship)

Via i.ytimg.com

Via i.ytimg.com

This title floated around for a total 8 days before it went up in flames with the rest of WCW. In 2001, WCW tried to pump more excitement into its cruiserweight division by creating the WCW Cruiserweight Tag Team titles, which were awarded after a tournament spanning several weeks. However, WCW held that tournament with a fraction of what its cruiserweight division used to be. The likes of Chris Jericho, Dean Malenko, and Eddie Guerrero had left WCW by then. Most of the matches didn’t seem to extend beyond five minutes. In the end, an unmasked Rey Mysterio and Billy Kidman were defeated by Kid Romeo in a Ricky Martin gimmick and Elix Skipper. The tag team titles were defended on the last episode of Nitro, where they were dropped before WWF bought WCW.

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