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15 Wrestling Stablemates You Never Knew Hated Each Other’s Guts

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Professional wrestling can be a cutthroat industry, and a difficult one for superstars to succeed in on their own. In the storylines, when more than two wrestlers band together to help one another achieve their goals, the industry refers to the group as a stable. Virtually every superstar to spend a significant stretch of time in WWE has spent time in one stable or another, and the group dynamic often proved integral in the later accomplishments of all members involved. Of course, what happens on screen doesn’t always match what happens backstage, and not every wrestler in every stable has managed to get along with one another. Much the same as with tag teams, there have been plenty of stables in WWE history filled with wrestlers who absolutely loathed one another, longing for the day the group would finally part ways.

For as expansive as certain stables have been, animosities and jealousies typically don’t run as high as they do in tag teams. Most stable mates who hated one another typically did so for reasons unrelated to the fact they were paired on screen, usually with the resentment stemming from something that happened well before their company decided they should work together. Even the biggest stables in history have been filled with resentment, with iconic groups like D-Generation X and The Four Horsemen both hotbeds of simmering personalities held together by thin pretenses. The most shocking examples of hatred will probably come as complete surprises to most fans, though, thanks to the continued obscurity of even the most scandalous tales in Japanese wrestling. Keep reading to learn about 15 stable mates you had no idea hated each other’s guts.

15. D-Generation X: Rick Rude Hated Shawn Michaels

via WWE

via WWE

Ever since Triple H began his rise up the WWE corporate ladder, the importance of D-Generation X has been increasingly built up in historical retrospectives of the Attitude Era. Something that gets washed over in most of these remembrances is the involvement of “Ravishing” Rick Rude, who actually served as one of the group’s founding members. Rude served as the bodyguard and manager to Shawn Michaels, although he only lasted the first three months DX was together. In a move of solidarity with Bret Hart, Rude walked out of DX and WWE after the 1997 Survivor Series, out of disgust over the way Michaels and Vince McMahon had treated Hart. According to Rude’s close friends, he was actually pretty disgusted with HBK the entire time they were together, and he didn’t find the DX shtick particularly funny. The sophomoric humor wasn’t exactly in line with his character, either, and the result was Rude wanting out from day one. While Montreal was merely the straw that broke the camel’s back, chances are Rude would’ve walked out of DX and happily been erased from the group’s history sooner rather than later.

14. Voodoo Murders: TARU Hated Super Hate

via photobucket.com

via photobucket.com

Stables are significantly more important in Japan than in the United States, and part of it has to do with the generally increased level of respect the Land of the Rising Sun gives to pro wrestling. The villainous Voodoo Murders always existed as a stark contrast to this respect, using violent heel antics to dominate All Japan Pro Wrestling and particularly their rivals in Roughly Obsess & Destroy, lead by Taka Michinoku. Voodoo Murders was founded and led by TARU, along with a number of well-known American wrestlers such as Chuck Palumbo, Viscera, Charlie Haas, and Giant Bernard. Two years later, Mitsu Hirai Jr. joined the group and changed his name to Hate. Eventually, Hate evolved into Super Hate, and negative feelings started brewing between Super Hate and TARU. In May of 2011, TARU and Super Hate were involved in a backstage fight that resulted in Hate suffering an acute hematoma, leaving him in a coma. The circumstances of the fight were never released to the public, though it’s clear anger and hatred were heavy factors. AJPW suspended TARU as a result of the fight, also punishing fellow Voodoo Murders members KONO, MAZADA, and Minoru, for standing by and not attempting to stop the assault. Super Hate is still recovering, while the others have all returned to the ring.

13. The Heenan Family: Rick Rude Hated Bobby Heenan

via WWE

via WWE

Contentious and argumentative pro wrestling fans often can be, there is an almost universal consensus on Bobby “The Brain” Heenan’s status as the greatest manager in WWE history. Therefore, it would be reasonable to imagine the wrestlers lucky enough to work with him were honored at the chance to do so, and viewed induction into his long-running stable The Heenan Family as a blessing to their careers. Most of Heenan’s clients did indeed feel this way, but according to Heenan, Rick Rude felt the exact opposite. Apparently, Rude was worried that Heenan’s gift of gab would take attention away from his own talents, causing fans to lose focus on who the real superstar was supposed to be. Luckily for Heenan, Rude was a member at a point when the Family was at its largest, with Andre The Giant, Paul Orndorff, Harley Race, Hercules, Haku, and Tama all there to protect The Brain from his wayward client. Despite Rude’s resistance, Heenan also claimed the heat only went one way, and he never had any problems with Rude regardless of Rude’s feelings towards him.

12. The Corporation: Triple H Hated Ken Shamrock

via WWE

via WWE

Wrestlers have long been accused of hazing and outright bullying newcomers to the industry, and this practice was especially rampant prior to WWE announcing their Be A Star anti-bullying campaign. However, there isn’t much a person can do to haze someone like Ken Shamrock, who entered WWE only a few years removed from his reign as the UFC Superfight Champion. There also wasn’t any realistic way to introduce Shamrock to a wrestling crowd that didn’t involve him beating the hell out of some of the less important wrestlers, a role Triple H was forced to play in 1997. According to Shamrock, Triple H never got over the job, and his anger was made all the worse by the fact he couldn’t do anything about it without earning an even bigger beating for real. Shamrock went on to postulate this resentment as the reason WWE never invited him back after his initial run, accusing Triple H of having an ego too big to ever forget a minor incident near the start of his career. Despite their problems, Triple H had apparently yet to earn a position of power to block Shamrock from teaming with him in The Corporation, though Shamrock did leave the group only one month after Triple H joined.

11. Hot Stuff International: Eddie Gilbert Hated Warrior

via tumblr.com

via tumblr.com

The wrestling industry has been kind on The Ultimate Warrior since his untimely death, focusing on his legacy as a performer over his irascible attitude that left him with only a few close friends in the industry. Eventually, Warrior reached a level of fame and success that other superstars were at least willing to work with him, but at the start of his career, it was a lot harder for his contemporaries to put up with his behavior. Warrior’s first brush with fame came in the UWF, where he formed The Blade Runners tag team with Sting. The Blade Runners had barely received any training or experience when they reached a national audience, so the two were forced to join wrestler/manager Eddie Gilbert’s Hot Stuff International, apparently much to the chagrin of both Gilbert and Warrior. Warrior refused to put up with Gilbert and UWF owner Bill Watts’ training methods, causing Gilbert once to remark early in Warrior’s career that he and Sting would “never make it.” While the real rift of the group was between Warrior and Gilbert, Warrior later claimed the whole ordeal caused him to have problem with Sting as well, because Sting always took Gilbert and Watts’s sides over his.

10. The Flock: Raven Hated Hammer

via WWE

via WWE

Paul Heyman once claimed his vision for Raven was to create wrestling’s David Koresh, and as such, a menagerie of unwashed and unloved freaks have followed Raven throughout practically ever wrestling company he’s spent time in. While Raven’s greatest achievements came in ECW, his highest exposure was most likely WCW, where he established his largest band of losers and called them his Flock. Though The Flock eventually grew to include nearly a dozen members, Raven’s initial idea for the group only included himself, Perry Saturn, Stevie Richards, and Sick Boy. Raven’s problems with Stevie got Richards fired from WCW early on, and he was replaced with a wide array of middling talents, many of whom Raven didn’t want in the group at all. Scotty Riggs, Ron Reis, and Lodi were all added without his approval, but he didn’t really mind since they were all friends of his. Raven also didn’t want Kidman in the group, either, and Kidman wanted out, too, though Raven gradually grew to accept him due to his in-ring performance. The one outlier was Hammer, who Raven didn’t want in the group or like, and only put up with at the insistence of “Diamond” Dallas Page. The other Flock members had reason to dislike Hammer, as well, considering he allegedly ruined their long running gimmick of sitting in the crowd and hanging out with fans when he was caught lighting a cigarette during a taping of Nitro.

9. La Résistance: Sylvain Grenier Hated René Duprée

via WWE

via WWE

There are pros and cons to finding success at a young age, something René Duprée, the only wrestler to win a WWE championship while still a teenager, knows all too well. René is the son of Emile Duprée, a Canadian wrestling promoter, which explains how he began his career at the very young age of 14. Because of this early start, René wished to eschew the typical WWE developmental training and make a splash on Raw right away, getting his chance to do so by teaming with Sylvain Grenier in the French Canadian nationalist team La Résistance. Bridging the gap between tag teams that don’t get along and stables that don’t get along, the duo achieved instant success and won the WWE Tag Team Championships in May of 2003, only to decide right away things weren’t working out on a personal level. Duprée and Grenier were so open about their problems with one another that a third member, Rob Conway, was added to the mix to keep them apart. Grenier and Conway fast became friends, while Duprée was left to his own devices. Grenier and Duprée continued their feud years later on Twitter, though it seems they eventually made up and tagged together on the independent scene once more.

8. The Nation of Domination: Ahmed Johnson Hated Faarooq

via WWE

via WWE

Similar to the rise of Triple H and DX, retrospectives on The Nation Of Domination tend to focus on the group starting in early 1998 when Rocky Maivia usurped the leadership role from Faarooq. The NOD had actually existed almost a year and a half at that point, with an ever-changing band of brutes helping Faarooq achieve his goals of black power. Initially, the purpose of the NOD was to help Faarooq in his war against Ahmed Johnson, which made it all the more confusing when Ahmed turned heel and joined the group in mid 1997. Making matters even worse, Ahmed and Faarooq had infamously been unable to get along backstage for years, with both of them admitting to having intentionally injured one another out of spite during their original feud. When Rocky replaced Ahmed in the Nation, he apparently was also replacing Faarooq as the object of Ahmed’s anger, since the two went on to get in a backstage brawl later that year. Ahmed’s tenure in the Nation was always considered a terrible move, and knowing more about how the wrestlers felt about it only serves to prove that point.

7. The Mexicools: Psicosis And Super Crazy Hated Juvi

via WWE

via WWE

WWE has been accused of lacking sensitivity towards certain social and cultural mores, and never has this been more publicly on display than with the much-maligned Mexicools stable of superstars from South of the Border. The three stylish Mexicans in question were Juventud Guerrera, Psicosis, and Super Crazy, all of whom stood out during the Attitude Era in WCW and ECW thanks to their high flying and innovative move sets. The same skills were on display in WWE, though marred somewhat by age and the horribly offensive gimmick the three were saddled with. As though the gimmick wasn’t bad enough, the Mexicools also had to contend with the fact Psicosis and Juventud Guerrera had trouble working with one another dating back to their time in WCW, and getting paired together in WWE apparently only made things worse. The root of the issue was Juvi’s substance abuse and egomania, causing Super Crazy to side with Psicosis, albeit not in a manner that relaxed tensions in the slightest. Ultimately, Juventud was fired for his attitude problems in early 2006, with the other two distancing themselves from his as much as possible to avoid connection to his behavior.

6. The Four Horsemen: Ric And Arn Hated Paul Roma

via WWE

via WWE

History has repeatedly proven the public loves a good revival, and yet it has also shown that if that revival fails to live up to the original, the people will turn on it with a furious and unforgiving vengeance. The various incarnations of The Four Horsemen have included revivals of both varieties, with many fans debating over which four (or three, or five) wrestlers made their favorite group. While there’s no consensus on the best Four Horsemen, just about everyone agrees on the worst, one of the least popular wrestlers in the business, Paul Roma. Roma earned his unpopularity by speaking out against his fellow Horsemen and every other tag team partner he ever had, always claiming he was the true star of the group, and specifically that Arn Anderson “looked like the Pillsbury doughboy.” Roma’s comparatively impressive physique notwithstanding, Flair and the fans took Arn’s side, and have since refused to even acknowledge Roma as a legitimate Horsemen. The fact the group couldn’t even find a fourth Horsemen during Roma’s tenure is generally ignored, considering there wasn’t a wrestler alive talented enough to make up for the damage that Roma’s addition to the fold irreparably caused.

5. The New Blood: Vince Russo Hated Eric Bischoff

via WWE

via WWE

WCW made so many mistakes in the year 2000 dozens of lists have been made on the subject already, so for now let’s focus on the attempted partnership between Eric Bischoff and Vince Russo. The two decided to try and work together in April of that year, after both had experienced difficulty in running the sinking ship on their own. Part of their master plan was to band together the younger up-and-coming WCW talents in a group called The New Blood, which the two of them would lead against a group of older talents, The Millionaire’s Club. While a decent idea on paper, in practice, The New Blood was rife with difficulty from day one, mostly due to Russo and Bischoff’s inability to work together as a team. What started as mere creative differences quickly blossomed into full-fledged hatred, and yet the two kept trying to work together until Bash At The Beach 2000, when Bischoff walked out of the company due to Russo shooting on Hulk Hogan. In retrospect, Russo claimed he didn’t like Bischoff  with their very first conversation, no doubt making him difficult to work with the entire relationship.

4. nWo: Kevin Nash Hated Hulk Hogan

via WWE

via WWE

Most critics paint the biggest problem leading to WCW falling apart as the company’s repeat mistake in letting the inmates run the asylum, specifically giving too much power to Hulk Hogan and Kevin Nash. This was an issue when Hogan and Nash were working together, so naturally it became near catastrophic any time the two had reason to quarrel with one another. Prior to the nWo’s formation, Hogan was used to doing whatever he wanted and everyone else falling in line, while Nash regularly interjected with thoughts and opinions of his own. Once Nash was promoted to head booker of WCW in 1999, tensions reached a boiling point due to Hogan consistently rejecting Nash’s ideas mere hours before Nitro was supposed to go on the air. In fairness, Nash always did his best to adapt to Hogan’s demands and rarely complained, in hindsight being able to let bygones be bygones and work with Hogan again dozens of times in the future. Still, there can be no denying Hogan made a difficult task almost impossible for Nash, and therefore Kevin is within his right to have thought Hogan was making his job a living hell at the time.

3. The Magnificent Seven: Scott Steiner Hated Ric Flair

via WWE

via WWE

Given the group name and the list of wrestlers involved, The Magnificent Seven looked on paper like it should have been a sure thing, when in reality it was horrifically doomed months before anyone in WCW had the idea to put them together. Formed in January of 2001, the group was the latest in WCW’s long line of authority backed heel stables, lead by company CEO Ric Flair and featuring WCW Champion Scott Steiner, WCW US Champion Rick Steiner, and fellow top talents Jeff Jarrett, Buff Bagwell, Lex Luger, and Road Warrior Animal. However, the whole point was for their Magnificence to band together against Sid Vicious, who broke his leg seconds prior to the group’s official formation. They instead feuded with Kevin Nash and “Diamond” Dallas Page, though proceedings were still marred by the fact everyone knew Scott Steiner legitimately hated Ric Flair, thanks to a Nitro interview the year prior where Steiner broke the script to talk about his genuine problems with The Nature Boy. Not that the group would have worked had Steiner not made those comments, but the fact he did made them even deader on arrival than the fact they’re enemy broke his own leg.

2. D-Generation X: The New Age Outlaws Hated Triple H

via WWE

via WWE

It’s easy enough for fans to forget about Rick Rude’s involvement in D-Generation X, considering he was only a member for a handful of months. The New Age Outlaws are much harder to forget, as Billy Gunn and The Road Dogg survived multiple incarnations of the group, serving as the longest surviving members of the group outside of founders HBK and HHH. The Outlaws joined the fray shortly after HBK’s first retirement, meaning they spent significant amounts of time alone with Triple H during his rise to the top, and according to them, it wasn’t entirely pretty. Though they’ve since changed their tunes in order to get rehired by WWE, during a 2006 interview, both Gunn and Road Dogg were highly critical of Triple H, especially during the time they spent together in DX. Allegedly, Triple H refused to watch The Outlaws’s backs or help them stay employed while he rose up the corporate ladder, something they found themselves bitter about when stuck in TNA. Rehab seems to have cleared up any lingering resentment, and most video evidence of their complaints has been wiped from the Internet, but fans won’t soon forget what could well be Gunn and Road Dogg’s true feelings.

1. The Four Horsemen: Ole Anderson Hated Everyone

via WWE

via WWE

When Paul Roma popped up on this list, the whole point was that Ric Flair and Arn Anderson felt like Roma wasn’t Horsemen material. This time around that argument goes out the window, because we’re talking about the original Four Horsemen, Ric, Arn, Ole, and Tully Blanchard. The Four Horsemen were such an iconic group upon arrival that the very term we use to designate a group of wrestlers is the same used to describe where horses live, so their significance truly cannot be overstated. Despite this group’s status as the original four, when WWE inducted The Four Horsemen into the Hall Of Fame, Ole Anderson was left out in favor of Barry Windham, perhaps due to the decades of animosity between Ole, Flair, and Blanchard. Blanchard is the only one to have admitted fault, years later explaining his drug use made him hard to be around in general. The issue between Flair and Ole has yet to go away, possibly only growing stronger in the decades since the two stopped working together. It apparently stems from a small $800 loan Ole gave to Flair and never had returned, which given Flair’s success, shouldn’t have been that hard to do. Of course, Flair surely has his reasons for refusing to pay Ole back, as well, and he may not be alone in them, since Ole has problems with almost everyone he worked with.

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