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10 Outrageous Cases Of Professional Misconduct

Most Shocking
10 Outrageous Cases Of Professional Misconduct

via mirror.co.uk / via dailymail.co.uk

Let’s play a game.

Say you had to have a complex procedure, like a heart bypass, done. Given your choice of doctors, you’d probably pick the surgeon that had seen the most patients, right? He’d probably be well versed and the procedure is likely to go without a hitch.

But that logic wouldn’t hold up if you were being treated by Fresno cardiac surgeon, Dr. Pervaiz Chaudhry. With over 300 bypass surgeries (in one year) under his belt, Chaudry was considered one of the top five heart surgeons in California.

But Chaudry also had below-average patient survival rates; and while some blamed it on the workload, the surgeon also had a few unprofessional habits. He was known to abandon surgeries halfway through, and just go to lunch. He carried on like this, till his actions led to complications that put a patient in a vegetative state.

You see, if you made the choice based on “numbers” alone, you’d be making grave mistake.

And Chaudry isn’t the only one; lawyers, police officers, accountants, all these people we look up to as professionals can flip and their actions will send chills down your spine. Here are ten of them that made us say “Wait.. they did WHAT?”

10. Fireman Set Over 2,000 Fires 

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John L. Orr wore many hats; fire captain, arson investigator, crime novelist and serial arsonist. He was accused of setting over 2,000 fires in the LA area. Alongside the millions of dollars worth of damage caused, one of his fires in 1984 led to four deaths.

To avoid detection, he’d start a decoy fire in hills near his intended target, and while the fire crews were battling that, he’d set fire to his intended targets. Orr became so attention-hungry that he wrote Points of Origin, a novel about a fireman-turned-arsonist. Orr based the character on himself and the book was even turned into a HBO film.

In 1987, after a failed attempt to burn a store, police found a piece of paper that had his fingerprint on it. He was arrested, charged with arson and the four murders; Orr spent the next 25 years behind bars.

9. DEA Agents Steal $800,000 In Cryptocurrency While Trying To Shut Down Illegal Site

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Silk Road was once the Internet’s Amazon for all things illegal; drugs, murder for hire, guns, all illicit goods could be bought there. The best part was that all transactions were untraceable because payments were made using cryptocurrency.

The activities of the underground website soon caught the attention of law enforcement and the DEA planned an elaborate sting operation. DEA special agent Carl Force and Secret Service special agent Shaun Bridges went undercover to gather intel that could lead to the website getting shut down and the arrest of founder, Ross Ulbricht.

But, over a two year period, Force and Bridges switched things up and stole as much of the digital currency as they could. Bridges, 32, was accused of diverting $800,000 worth of bitcoins into a personal account.

Apart from stealing hundreds of thousands in bitcoins, Force also took over $250,000 from Ulbricht in exchange for information on the investigation. Using multiple personas, he claimed to know who the moles were and sold the information to Ulbricht.

They were eventually busted, and charged with extortion, money laundering and obstruction of justice. The pair currently await sentencing.

8. Abortion Doctor Carries Out Late-Term Abortions

via: washingtonpost.com

via washingtonpost.com

Kermit Gosnell is a former physician who ran the Women’s Medical Society abortion clinic in Philadelphia. After receiving his Medical Degree, the doctor spent almost 40 years practicing medicine in low-income neighborhoods of West Philadelphia. Some of the services he set up include a rehab clinic, a teen aid program and an abortion clinic.

This abortion clinic was soon the target of many complaints. In 1972, he was accused of using an experimental abortion device on 15 women which led to 9 of them developing severe complications. Over the next three decades, he faced complaints including employing unlicensed personnel, working in a poor sanitary environment and multiple patient complaints.

In 2010, after exposure by a whistleblower, Gosnell’s clinic was raided and the conditions of the clinic mandated that it be shut down immediately. Gosnell was arrested and charged with illegal drug prescription and carrying out late-term abortions.

Further investigations revealed that he had killed seven babies that were born alive, by severing their spinal cords with scissors. He was also responsible for the death of Karnamaya Mongar, in 2009. After a lengthy trial, Gosnell was sentenced to life in prison in 2013.

7. 9-1-1 Dispatcher Hangs Up On Call, Person Ends Up Dying

via thetruthaboutguns.com

via thetruthaboutguns.com

You know how 911 dispatchers are supposed to keep a level head? They’re supposed to calm callers down, regardless of how distraught the caller may be. It turns out not everyone can stay calm under stress, leading to tragic consequences.

In June 2015, a house party in Albuquerque was underway when a car drove by letting off six shots towards the house. 17-year old Jaydon Chavez-Silver was caught in the cross fire. As he lay critically injured, his friend called 911.

Distraught and in tears, she was trying to perform CPR while giving the dispatcher crucial details. In the heat of their conversation, fed up with repeatedly answering if Chavez-Silver was breathing, she lashed out “How many times do I have to (expletive) tell you?”

The dispatcher on the line, a veteran firefighter, Matthew Sanchez, responded by saying “…you know what, ma’am? You can deal with it yourself. I’m not gonna deal with this…”, and he hung up. Chavez-Silver later died of his injuries. The dispatcher has been temporarily suspended while investigations are carried out.

 

6. Bank Refuses To Serve Customers Needing Financial Help

via theguardian.com

via theguardian.com

The harsher economy has led to more people looking for ways to make their money last longer. This has led to increased thrift shopping, couponing, even asking for saving advice from your bank. But Lloyds Banking group, the UK’s largest provider of basic bank accounts, decided its customers couldn’t have that.

An email from a senior manager was leaked to the press in May and it instructed staff to ignore some customers. These customers were those the bank didn’t think they were making any money from. Staff were advised to cancel appointments with customers who only wanted help or advice.

This aggressive sales culture had already cost the bank a £28million fine in 2013, when it was discovered that staff who could sell the most customers investments and insurance, were gifted with champagne. And staff who missed targets? They stood to lose up to 50% of their wages.

5. Crime Lab Chemist Faked Test Results, Leading To Wrongful Convictions

via cognoscenti.wbur.org

via cognoscenti.wbur.org

Until her arrest in 2012, Annie Dookkan had spent nine years as a crime lab chemist in Massachusetts. Her primary role was to perform drug tests for criminal cases, which she seemed to excel at. In the 60,000 cases she processed, she helped convict over 11,000 “criminals”. Maybe it was in part due to her masters degree in chemistry, but she seemed to consistently outpace her colleagues. She also took the stand in multiple cases that led to convictions.

However, in 2010, a chemist found seven instances where Dookhan had incorrectly identified a substance as narcotics. When interviewed by the police, she confessed to faking test results for over two years. She admitted to adding cocaine to samples, lying about having a masters degree, identifying drugs merely by looking at them, and even forging her colleague’s signatures on evidence.

In the wake of the scandal, investigations found that over 11,000 had been jailed, due to her “work”. She pleaded guilty to perjury, tampering with evidence and obstruction of justice, in 2012. She was sentenced to three to five years, followed by a two-year probation.

4. Zoo Staff To Blame For Animal Deaths

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Many animal lovers are adamant about zoos being the wrong place to keep animals. But for most people, the argument that zoos can be blamed for animal deaths sounds silly. Isn’t that where they are watched and cared for?

But that premise has been shaken in recent years. Many zoos have been found guilty of appalling treatment of the animals they’re supposed to protect. On the Tweddle Farm in England, an outbreak of E.coli caused death among many animals. An investigation revealed that many of the dead animals were left to rot where they fell, as long as it was out of sight.

Zoos classify some animals as “surplus”; these are animals that result from a large litter being born. To keep their costs down, zoos routinely kill off these “surplus” animals. In 2005, two wolf cubs and an adult female were killed at Dartmoor Wildlife Park, due to overcrowding.

In 2014, a Danish zoo killed four healthy lions, only a few weeks after killing a giraffe.

3. Old Citizen Commits Suicide While Officers Do Nothing

via: twitter.com/Tom Bradby

via twitter.com/Tom Bradby

The economic and financial situation in Greece continues to cause more damage than many realize on a daily basis. Since the crisis started, the suicide rate has gone up in Greece, by an estimated 35% in only two years.

In August 2015, 70 year old Ioannis Venardos, had enough of the rationing and his poor health. Determined not to be a burden to his sons, he decided to commit suicide by driving off the harbor wall and into the sea at Port Rafina. His attempt didn’t go unnoticed as it was the height of summer and the harbor milled with tourists and locals. But did anyone lift a finger?

Of the ten officials, including customs and policemen who stood nearby, only one attempted to help Venardos. A vacationing reporter, the political editor at the UK’s ITV News jumped in the sea to help, but he couldn’t save the pensioner.

2. Doctor Punches Patient, Who Eventually Dies

via mirror.co.uk / via dailymail.co.uk

via mirror.co.uk / via dailymail.co.uk

In a 2013 incident, Andrey Votyakov, chief of anesthesiology at the Russian Federal Cardo-Surgery Center, showed the depths that exhaustion can drive one to. Votyakov decided to finish a 24-hour shift by checking up on a patient he had operated on earlier.

Finding the man conscious, CCTV footage shows them exchanging a few words, before Votyakov suddenly slammed his fist into the bed-bound patient’s face. He then punched him again right above the heart.

When confronted with the footage, Votyakov claimed the patient insulted him and didn’t appreciate his work on “his very complicated case.” The patient died a week later and Votyakov was relieved of his position. In 2014, he was sentenced to five months of community service and a 100,000 ruble ($1478.03 ) fine.

1. Esteemed Sheriff Jailed In Detention Facility Named After Him

via: denverpost.com

via denverpost.com

When Arapahoe County Sheriff Patrick T. Sullivan was named National Sheriff’s Deputy of the Year in 2001, everyone agreed that he deserved the award. The entire county decided to honor him on his retirement in 2002, by naming the local jail after him.

The former County Sheriff soon got bored with retirement, so he joined a task force that helped formulate many of the drug laws used in Colorado today. But in that time, the former Sheriff had become a meth user himself, while also becoming notorious in Colorado’s gay scene.

Following a sting operation in 2012, Sullivan was busted trying to trade sex for meth. He was arrested and booked at the Patrick T. Sullivan Correctional Facility! In 2014, he was sentenced to 30 days in jail and 15 months in prison for probation, while the county jail has since undergone a name change.


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