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The 15 Cheesiest Title Drops In Movies

Entertainment
The 15 Cheesiest Title Drops In Movies

Via usatoday.com

When naming a film, the title can take on a literal or objective phrase of words in order to summarize the plot as simplistically as possible. Believe it or not, it’s one of the most important aspects of the movie. It doesn’t matter if you include one of the most desired actors or actresses in Hollywood, the title is the headline that first captures the attention of the audiences. It can accurately illustrate what the film will entail in a matter of seconds.

While songs and even books are known for dropping the title at some point or another throughout the work, it’s more uncommon for it to occur in motion pictures. However, it does happen, and more often than not, we are most likely not aware of it. To our dismay, the drops may contain more cheese than a delicious slice of pizza, but they ultimately turn out to be inevitable in the long run. It doesn’t matter if the film is a comedy, romance, or horror, if the opportunity makes itself available to work in the title of the movie somewhere in the film, it will definitely happen. And as audience members, we either take it in stride, roll our eyes, or laugh at the sheer corniness of it all.

No matter our response as viewers, it’s an aspect of cinema that most likely won’t disappear anytime soon. Keep reading to find out The 15 Cheesiest Title Drops In Movies. And yes, that was a title drop…

15. Gone Baby Gone 

Via justwatch.com

Via justwatch.com

Based on the 1998 detective novel by Dennis Lehane, the Affleck brothers collaborated to bring Gone Baby Gone to life. With Ben Affleck co-writing the screenplay and directing his first feature-length film, the neo-noir mystery film debuted with high expectations. The film featured Casey Affleck portraying a private investigator, who works alongside his partner/girlfriend, played by Michelle Monaghan, and are hired to find a young abducted child. The suspense- and drama-ridden film captivated viewers with every twist and turn of the plot. However, it briefly lost its serious tone when the name of the movie was dropped during a highly sensitive moment, “And if that girl’s only hope is you, well I pray for her. ‘Cause she’s gone, baby. Gone.” While the title drop didn’t exactly hinder the film’s success, it could have easily been interchanged with another phrase that illustrated that there was limited hope of finding the child. The film went on to win several significant awards and appeared on multiple top ten lists for best films of 2007.

14. Taken 

Via usatoday.com

Via usatoday.com

Despite questioning how many times Liam Neeson’s on-screen daughter can actually be kidnapped before we stop believing he is capable of protecting her, we are proved wrong with the former CIA operative’s skills. The Taken trilogy has been referred to being a pivotal role for Neeson’s career for it redefined him as an action film star. With the combination of the plot, well-choreographed fight scenes, and Neeson’s frightening demeanor, the first of the three films acquired the highest grossing revenue. While the debut film was well-received, fans couldn’t help but roll their eyes when Neeson’s character Bryan Mills drops the line, “She’s been taken”, in reference to the kidnapping of his daughter, Kim. Whether intentional or not, there’s an array of synonyms that could have been used to avoid the title drop (as if the movie didn’t have enough cheesy one-liners). Simply using ‘kidnapped’ or ‘abducted’ would have sufficed. But either way, the retired spy had a particular set of skills acquired over time that aided in his fight to find and kill the culprits responsible for taking his daughter.

13. The Breakfast Club 

Via newsweek.com

Via newsweek.com

Let’s face it, there is nothing better than a John Hughes film. The legendary American film director and writer is responsible for creating the most beloved 80s movies. His work on teen movies gave way to the ‘Brat Pack’ group, that was comprised of numerous high-profile actors that were in great demand over thirty years ago. Hughes’ 1985 film, The Breakfast Club, featured several of the ‘Brat Pack’ members, including Emilio Estevez, Anthony Michael Hall, and Molly Ringwald. Telling the story of five completely different stereotyped teens who’ve ended up in Saturday detention together, the coming of age-comedy film was filled with both laughs and emotional insight. As the film approached its end, the group appointed Brian, the brain of the group, the task of completing the mandatory essay. The letter was a touching close of the time the five teens spent together, as they learned that everything isn’t as it seems, for there is more to life than labels that define an individual. Brian’s voice-over of the letter reads, “But what we found out is that each one of us is a brain, and an athlete, and a basket case, a princess, and a criminal. Does that answer your question? Sincerely yours, The Breakfast Club.” The heartfelt lesson penned in the essay is the signing of the ‘Breakfast Club’, rather than each teen’s name. This was a title drop that evidently couldn’t be avoided. Nonetheless, don’t you forget that it’s still a classic.

12. Death Proof 

Via youtube.com

Via youtube.com

Written and directed by Quentin Tarantino, Death Proof, his 2007 film, starred Kurt Russell whose character uses staged car accidents to murder young women. His go-to weapon of choice; his ‘death proof’ stunt car. The action horror film received a mixture of positive and negative reviews as it was referred to as one of Tarantino’s weakest films. However, it was in the running to receive the Palme d’Or award during its showing at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival. But those less than stellar critics may have been onto something with its overall appearance of being a low budget film and the inconsequential conversation. When Russell’s character, who worked as a stuntman, was asked if the car was safe, his answer was, “It’s better than safe. It’s death proof.” (cue the laughing and eye rolls). But seeing as the character had a fetish for using his stunt car as an accessory for murder, it seemed annoyingly appropriate to drop the title in that way.

11. High School Musical 3: Senior Year 

Via teenvogue.com

Via teenvogue.com

What team? The Disney Channel has been known for creating many hit original movies over the years, but it was the 2006 release of High School Musical that captivated the young audiences. Starring the younger, but still swoon-worthy Zac Efron, fans fell in love with the teen romantic comedy that featured a basketball star with a secret talent for singing. The debut film was successfully followed by two additional films; High School Musical 2 and High School Musical 3: Senior Year. With catchy, teeny-bopper songs and dance moves, the franchise paid an ode to the accomplishing trilogy with the final curtain call song, “High School Musical”. In true Disney fashion, the sugary sweet lyrics repeatedly mentioned the title of the three movies stating, “But hold on to High School Musical. Let’s celebrate where we come from…”. Cheesy? Absolutely. But don’t deny the fact that you found yourself singing right along with them. After all, we’re all in this together.

10. Goodfellas 

Via huffingtonpost.com

Via huffingtonpost.com

The 1990 film adaptation of the non-fiction book Wiseguy by Nicholas Pileggi, came to life in theaters as Goodfellas. The dynamic trio comprised of Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, and Ray Liotta, was one of the driving forces that led to its ultimate success. The book-to-film adaptation went on to be nominated for six Academy Awards, in addition to its overall positive reviews from critics. As a notorious film in the crime genre, three mob members strive to move up in the ranks regardless of being oblivious to the problems they cause for those around them. Despite often being identified as the one of the best films of all time, it did have its own moment where the title was dropped in order to prove the comparison of characters, “They’re people like us… they’re goodfellas.” While it would have been effective enough to label them as criminals, using the term of the title was the best way to get the message across.

9. Back To The Future 

Via ew.com

Via ew.com

The beloved Back to the Future trilogy debuted its first film in 1985 and gave way to two additional successful movies. The science fiction comedy offered a unique sense of adventure as it starred Michael J. Fox as Marty McFly and Christopher Lloyd who portrayed an eccentric scientist by the name of Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown. After meeting in a shopping mall parking lot, Marty is introduced to the Doc’s time machine and is quickly thrown into a whirlwind of action as they visit past and present times. The traveling is given the perfect opportunity for the film to mention the title of the film when questioning the next move. During the three films, the title was mentioned in each one. The inaugural film used it in the context of, “Next Saturday night, we’re sending you back to the future.” Incredibly cheesy, but slightly inevitable, unless Doc and Marty knew of the specific date in which they were visiting.

8. Kill Bill 

Via independence.co.uk

Via independence.co.uk

The two-part film, Kill Bill, featured an array of martial arts skills and released the first volume in 2003. The second half was released a year later in order to avoid a run time of over four hours. Uma Thurman headlines the duology as The Bride, who sets out to seek revenge against her former team of assassins who betrayed her. With her determined demeanor and intense fighting skills, the woman scorned proved herself to be a force to be reckoned with. Her plan of attack is clearly stated as Thurman’s character expresses, “I’ve killed a hell of a lot of people to get to this point, but I have only one more. The last one. The one I’m driving to right now. The only one left. And when I arrive at my destination, I am gonna kill Bill.” This title drop gives more concrete support to The Bride’s dedication for seeking revenge against the man whose bullet sent her into a four-year-long coma. I don’t know about you, but I’d hate to be Bill.

7. 21 Jump Street 

Via variety.com

Via variety.com

With the immensely popular 1987 television series, a live action comedy spin on 21 Jump Street was brought to the silver screen in 2012. The combination of Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum successfully illustrated the duo’s comedic acting abilities. As both their characters expressed lacking law enforcement skills after graduating from the Police Academy, they are reassigned to infiltrate a high school in order to take down the dealer of a synthetic drug that has been spread around the school. In this particular movie, the cheesy title drop was bound to happen. While other films have verbally mentioned the title, 21 Jump Street used a combination of the two. When receiving their new task force information, their captain flubbed on the correct name, “Tomorrow Morning, you are both going to report to… 37 Jump Street. Wait, no, that doesn’t sound right. What was it again?” The scene then preceded to the street view of the building that clearly read the address of 21 Jump Street.

6. Fight Club 

Via theverge.com

Via theverge.com

Fight Club most likely wins the award for the most amount of times of mentioning the film’s title during a single scene. Actually, in a single line, to be more accurate. The 1999 film that is based on the award-winning novel with the same name, stars Brad Pitt, Helena Bonham Carter, and Edward Norton. Pitt and Norton’s characters form a fight club that receives quick success and attention. With the growth their bar basement fights earn, the two are able to accept more willing fighters into the organization. During the initial group meeting, the men are warned of the club’s two rules, “The first rule of Fight Club is… do not talk about Fight Club. Second rule of Fight Club… you do not talk about Fight Club.” In case Pitt’s character failed to make the rules clear, you shouldn’t talk about Fight Club. Must be pretty important if it needed to be said twice.

5. How To Lose A Guy In 10 Days

Via startribune.com

Via startribune.com

Romantic comedies are a beloved theme of films, especially if Matthew McConaughey is starring as the male lead male. In 2003, McConaughey starred opposite of Kate Hudson in the ultimate battle of the sexes film, How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days. After witnessing one of her best friends suffer a breakdown over another break-up, journalist Andie Anderson (Hudson) is inspired to put the classic mistakes women make while in a relationship to the test in an article exposé, which her editor-in-chief loved. And what did she call it? Yep you guessed it, “’How to Lose a Guy in Ten Days.’ Yes. Go.” With Andie being the magazine’s resident ‘How To’ girl, it only seemed natural that the title would be used as the article’s headline, which would eventually lead to the title being dropped during the movie at some point or another. But like all predictable rom-coms, the plan would backfire and true love would ensue.

4. Armageddon 

Via denofgeek.com

Via denofgeek.com

Michael Bay’s 1998 science fiction thriller, Armageddon, may have received negative reviews by critics, but it racked up multiple Academy Award nominations. With the likes of Bruce Willis and Ben Affleck leading as the film’s main characters, the sci-fi disaster picture followed a group of blue-collar deep-core drillers who were enlisted by NASA to save the world. In the hopes of stopping a large asteroid from colliding with and ultimately ending any signs of life on Earth, the group was the last resort for prevention. The movie offered a mix of suspense, romance, and comedy, that was pivotal in the overall context, but it did experience a brief pause of the fictional doom when the title was served up on a silver platter for viewers. As the United States President is shown addressing the country on the developing events he states, “The Bible calls this day ‘Armageddon’.” Basically, it was a nicer way of telling a billion frightened citizens that their death was approaching as fast as the gigantic asteroid was making its way towards their planet. So while it may have been tacky of the screenplay, it was much more appealing than the truth.

3. Jurassic Park 

cbsnew.com

Via cbsnews.com

Steven Spielberg’s massive blockbuster hit, Jurassic Park, based on the novel by Michael Crichton, gave way to a successful franchise with its release in 1993. The infamous film illustrates three specialists who are brought into the park to pacify investors after suffering an incident in which an employee was killed. Upon arriving, the trio, comprised of a paleontologist, paleobotanist and a chaos theorist, are greeted by the company’s CEO and park’s creator. His warm welcome is accompanied by a simple, “Welcome… to Jurassic Park,” as the franchise’s theme score plays on in the background. Despite being a cheesy way of dropping the title, it was inevitable. Although it would have been completely accurate, the owner couldn’t have said “Welcome to the island where dangerous reptiles will hunt you down as their prey.” Exposing the real threat in his salutation wouldn’t have been helpful to his cause of ensuring the positive future of his lucrative business.

2. Hot Tub Time Machine 

Via slashfilm.com

Via slashfilm.com

In 2010, John Cusack, Rob Corddry, and Craig Robinson joined forces to bring the 2010 comedy, Hot Tub Time Machine, to life. The film followed three best friends who decided to hit pause on the problems they were facing in their lives by visiting a ski resort at Kodiak Valley. The very location in which they had experienced several good times in the past. While throwing back several drinks in the hotel’s hot tub and ultimately spilling the contents of one bottle on the tub’s console, the friends were unknowingly transported back into time. After putting the pieces together the next day and realizing they were back in the year of 1986, the group decided there could only be one explanation. The reasoning was a corny attempt to bring the title of the film full circle with the line, “It must be some kind of… hot tub time machine!” Thank you, Captain Obvious.

1. Dude, Where’s My Car 

Via fandango.com

Via fandango.com

The American comedy film that featured two stoners played by Ashton Kutcher and Seann William Scott, was a 2000 box office success, much to the surprise of critics. Unable to remember where they parked their vehicle after a night of debauchery, the young men find themselves tossed into a world of chaos. If the title didn’t offer enough clues as to what Dude, Where’s My Car entails, it is essentially about best friends waking up to killer hangovers and not being able to locate their automobile. Which in turn prompted one half of the duo to ask, “Dude, where’s my car?” We can’t deny that we didn’t see that one coming with the additional bizarre lines and antics the film contained. While the movie received negative reviews before its silver screen debut, the film opened as the second highest grossing movie during its opening weekend. In fact, the title was dropped in various pop cultural references as it became a minor catch phrase in the early 2000s. Dude, that’s not too shabby for a comedy with amateurish behaviors and situations.

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