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Mort Zuckerman Net Worth

Mort Zuckerman Net Worth

Net Worth: $2.5 Billion

Statistics
  • Source of Wealth Publishing and Real Estate
  • Birth Place Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Marital Status Divorced to Marla Prather
  • Full Name Mortimer Benjamin Zuckerman
  • Nationality Canadian-American
  • Date of Birth June 4, 1937
  • Ethnicity Jewish
  • Occupation Publisher and Real Estate Tycoon
  • Education Harvard Law School, Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and McGill University
  • Children two children
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About Mort Zuckerman

Publishing and real estate tycoon Mort Zuckerman has an estimated net worth of $2.5 billion as of May 2015 according to Forbes. According to Forbes.com, he is #613 in the World Billionaires List (#546 in 2012), #213 in the United States, and #190 in the Forbes 400 List. He was born Mortimer Benjamin Zuckerman on June 4, 1937 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada to a Jewish family. He earned his B.A. (1957) and BCL (1961) at McGill University but never took the bar exam. He earned his M.B.A. (1961) with a distinction of honor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. In 1962, he received an LL.M. degree from Harvard Law School.

Zuckerman remained as an associate professor for nine years at Harvard Business School and has taught at Yale University. He has worked for seven years at Cabot, Cabot & Forbes, a real estate firm. He bought the literary magazine The Atlantic Monthly in 1980 and served as the chairman from 1980 to 1999. He sold the magazine in 1999 to David G. Bradley for $12 million. He bought U.S. News & World Report in 1984 and remained as its editor-in-chief.

Mort Zuckerman is a frequent commentator on world affairs. He has appeared on MSNBC and The McLaughlin Group. He writes columns for U.S. News & World Report and the New York Daily News. He has backed Barack Obama during the 2008 presidential election. In 2012, he then supported Mitt Romney instead.