pinterest-p mail bubble share2 google-plus facebook twitter rss reddit linkedin2 stumbleupon
The Premium The Premium The Premium

Five Careers For People Who Like To Be In The Spotlight

Job & Salaries
Five Careers For People Who Like To Be In The Spotlight

Some people were born to be the center of attention. They seem predisposed to occupy conspicuous occupations in which they are the focal point. These people are confident in their ability to perform well when all eyes are on them, and appear to seek out and relish opportunities to be noticed.

On the other hand, some people were born into entirely different circumstances. Perhaps they were shy, stuttered, were teased and bullied in school, or they were just afraid to do anything that would bring attention to themselves. And then, they had some sort of epiphany, which led them to intentionally seek roles that placed them in the spotlight – either to overcome personal fears of rejection, or to prove something to their critics.

For example, many actors state that they took theater classes to overcome their shyness and fear of public speaking. Some athletes were scrawny kids who were teased by their classmates, and subsequently took steps to bulk up and significantly improve their physical appearance.

There’s nothing wrong with desiring to be the center of attention, and many people may not even be aware – or are unwilling to admit – that they enjoy being in the spotlight.

For example, beauty pageant contestants say that they compete to win prize money for college. However, there are numerous other types of scholarships that only require an essay, a transcript, and references. For someone seeking scholarship money, this appears to be a more viable option than one that requires applicants to apply a gallon of makeup, add a pound of additional hair, and walk around in stiletto heels wearing custom-made sequined dresses and padded bathing suits. In fact, according to Clifford Stanley, CEO of Scholarship America, which is the nation’s largest scholarship administrator, millions of dollars in scholarships are left on the table each year.

So, if you’re the type of person who likes to be in the spotlight, embrace your inner tendency to be in the limelight. And if 15 minutes of fame is not enough, the following five careers can offer the opportunity to be the center of attention every day.

Public Relations Specialist – Median Salary: $54,170

pr

Public relations specialists, also known as press secretaries in the government, represent their organization to the public. They give speeches, and also attend meetings and community events, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. They’re the visible face of the organization, and often appear before the media, consumers, and other members of the public, to answer questions. Even within the organization, public relations specialists are in the spotlight because the organization’s leaders look to them for guidance regarding how to communicate effectively.

Police Officer – Median Salary: $56,980

Police Officers

From their uniforms to their cars to their guns, police officers command attention wherever they go. When they drive down the street, they’re the focal point of motorists who abruptly reduce their speed, sit up straight, and end their phone calls. Also, when police officers walk down the street or into an establishment, their conspicuous presence causes people to lower their voices and usually modify their behavior. In addition, the sirens and flashing lights on the squad car draw attention to the vehicle, and announce that the police officers have official and urgent business to handle.

Broadcast News Anchor – Mean Salary: $55,380; Matt Lauer – $21.5 Million

Broadcast News Analyst

Broadcast news anchors are local, national, and international personalities who present the news to television viewers. They develop loyal audiences who tune in every day to watch them deliver current and breaking news stories. As a result of the status provided by their positions, some anchors also interpret the news and include their personal opinions on a variety of subjects. Because so many people see them so often, most broadcast news anchors are considered celebrities, and are often asked to host or speak at other events, based on the theory that their loyal viewers will follow them and support their efforts.

Actor/Entertainer – Median Hourly Pay $20.26; Leonardo DiCaprio – $37 Million/Year

Actors

Whether in a local dinner theatre, on the silver screen, or in an IMAX theatre, actors command attention just by walking down the street. Acting is perhaps the most unique occupation in the world since it’s the only job (other than undercover work) for which people get paid to pretend to be someone else – usually a fictitious character.

The level of accolades and fame increases as they perfect the craft of portraying these imaginary or historical individuals. And while people routinely ask for autographs from famous people and take pictures with them, actors have the unique distinction of being “stars” who are mobbed by fans seeking autographs and photos. In addition, with some actors, it’s not clear if they are stalked by paparazzi, or if they instruct their publicists to inform celebrity photographers of their movements to stage media coverage.

Professional Athlete –Median Salary: $40,060; Aaron Rodgers – $40 Million

Athletes

The roar of the crowd is intoxicating to professional athletes. True, they enjoy the thrill of competition, as well as a lucrative salary – and those who play team sports benefit from a sense of camaraderie and solidarity. However, for people who like to be in the spotlight, professional sports provides the adulation of thousands of screaming stadium fans and millions more watching via TV.

Also, fans shell out good money to purchase and wear jerseys emblazoned with their favorite player’s name and number on it, and fanatical fans have been known to name their children after professional athletes. And if the spotlight on the field is not enough, teams hold pre- and post-game press conferences to discuss game plans and tactics. To put this in perspective: surgeons who perform open heart and brain surgery– which can determine if a person lives or dies — don’t usually call press conferences before or after operations. In fact, how many people can even name a neurosurgeon or a cardiologist?

  • Ad Free Browsing
  • Over 10,000 Videos!
  • All in 1 Access
  • Join For Free!
GO PREMIUM WITH THERICHEST
Go Premium!

Videos